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Those Crazy Comedies!
Quirk of Fate

QUIRK OF FATE


 

How could a box of corn flakes almost start a world war?  Writing an ad campaign for a breakfast cereal back in the 1950's was tough enough, especially when you have to come up with one to get a check so you can give it to your landlady so she won't evict you.  That's what faces Rosie, Max and Sid, who hit upon the idea of quarantining the office.  When a man stumbles into their office, stabbed in the back, it's a whole new ballgame.   Now, of course nobody can leave since it's become a scene of the crime. More police show up along with legal secretaries, Russian travel agents, doctors and, worst of all, Rosie's mother!  Just when the investigation shows up it becomes clear that the dead guy is Butch Crenshaw, notorious bookie.  That is until the F. B. I. arrives, claiming the deceased is really Nick Mandelay, extortionist.  Not so, explains the secretary to the Russian Ambassador, stating the victim is Vladimir Kouskowski, a Russian Again!  Now the U. N. is involved!  "I'm waiting for the Pope to arrive, saying the dead guy is really Saint Habeas of Corpus!" the legal secretary exclaims.  The police keep wanting to arrest Rosie while her mother keeps trying to fix her up with a doctor.  Max keeps fighting off the amorous advances from the Russian agent while Sid keeps hoping his actor friend will come up with an idea to get them all out of this mess.  "All we're trying to do is sell corn flakes!" yells Rosie.  This fast-paced farce is full of lies, alibis and everybody is more concerned with who is in charge rather than who murdered the corpse.  This one set show calls for a cast of 20, 8 men and 12 women and will have your audience guessing until the final curtain.  And the one thing that no one can figure out is just what the victim meant when he whispered into Rosie's ear, "Quirk of Fate". 

8 men and  12 women. Published by Eldridge Plays.

 


 

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